Tag Archives: pcs

Osborne’s Spending Review – PCS Midlands Shows Government The Red Card

DWP Ravenhurst

DWP Ravenhurst

In his spending review last week, the chancellor announced further massive cuts to the public sector and the civil service on top of the £81bn which will be cut from public spending by 2014. We have already seen a two-year pay freeze and pay cap of 1% and increased pension contributions. More than 70,000 civil service jobs have been cut, the value of pensions reduced and terms and conditions threatened.

The government has refused to talk to us, and we are demanding real negotiations.

The new spending round will cut a further £11.5 billion in 2015/16 and include:

  • Saving a further £5bn from central government
  • Ending progression pay in civil service by 2016
  • 1% cap on public sector pay continued until April 2016
  • Budget cuts of 10% for justice, Defra, Treasury and Cabinet Office and Communities; 9.5% in DWP; 9% for transport; 8% in Foreign Office and department for energy and climate change; 7% in culture; 6% for Home Office and department for business innovation and skills; 5% in Revenue and Customs
  • 2% further cuts for devolved administrations
  • Cuts in defence civilians and allowances
  • 144,000 further job cuts in the public sector.
  • A cap on benefit payments, more cuts and restrictions

27 June protest day – stop the cuts

DWP Five Ways

DWP Five Ways

Highways Agency

Highways Agency

These cuts will have a devastating effect on you, your family and the services we provide. We organised a day of protest against these cuts – to pay, jobs and terms and conditions as part of our national campaign.

On 27 June, at every workplace and in our city centres, members protested to stop the cuts, and keep the pressure on ministers for real negotiations.

Gambling Commission

Gambling Commission

Courts

Courts

The cuts don’t work – there is an alternative

Despite the huge cuts to the public sector both the debt and the deficit are increasing. The economy has flatlined, leading to lower tax revenues and high benefit bills. Read about PCS’ alternative

PCS Midlands shows the government the red card

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PCS Strikes – 5th and 8th April

PCS April half days strikesFollowing their strike in March, PCS continue their rolling set of industrial actions with a half day strike on 5th April, the day before the new tax year sees the top rate of tax cut for anyone earning over £150,000/year – the top 1% of earners, whilst people claiming in and out of work benefits see tax increases in the form of 20% council tax payments, extra charges for the bedroom tax and a real terms cut in their benefits. This will be followed by a half day strike on the 8th April for some departments that aren’t on strike on the 5th.

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Report From PCS Strike

PCS March 20 2013 Office Of The Public GuardianOn Wednesday, the PCS Union who represent civil servants, began a series of industrial actions and strikes to defend jobs pay, conditions and pensions from this government’s austerity agenda. In Birmingham pickets were held around the city at government offices and job centres. Turnout rates in the region were at 80%-90% for many places, with over a third of the staff at Selly Oak Jobcentre turning out for the picket line itself.

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NUT Birmingham, Midlands PCS and Unite the Resistance Public Meeting on Pensions

Birmingham NUT and Midlands PCS have organsied a public meeting, with support from Unite the Resistance, on continuing the fight over pensions.

The meeting will have PCS General Secretary Mark Serwotka and NUT Dept General Secretary (and lead pensions negotiator for the NUT) speaking on the platform as well as a private sector pensions striker from Unilever speaking too.

Thursday 26th January, 6:30pm, Council Chamber, Council House, Victoria Square, Birmingham B1 1BB

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Mark Serwotka speaking at Lib Dem conference demo

Mark Serwotka, General Secretary of PCS, has confirmed to speak at the rally following the Liberal Democrat conference demonstration on Sunday 18th September.

Mark has been one of the best received speakers over the past 6 months, and it will be great to have him here in Birmingham on the platform of this demonstration.

PCS have been active locally in fighting cuts, and were one of the unions on strike on the 30th June, defending public sector pensions and services, and we are sure they will be well represented on 18th September. You can read about their proposed alternatives to the cuts here

Mark Serwotka speaking at the March for the Alternative on March 26th.

The next planning meeting for the Lib Dem conference is on Saturday 6th August, 11am, at Unison Offices, 19th Floor, McClaren Tower, Priory Queensway, B4 7NN. This will be followed by street stalls & leafletting from many of the groups involved in building this demonstration.

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J30 in Photos Part 2

So many events, so many photos.. more than enough to make a second post.. so here we are! (First post is here)

UNISON

Lifford House

Yardley

At the Rally

Kings Heath demo

Small Heath Demo

Handsworth Demo

NUT

On the march

Banner on March

Inflatable

ATL

Flags on the march

Placard

Flag on the march

UCU

Placard

Banner at the rally

Banner on march

Connexions

Broad Street demo

Marching to Victoria Sq

At the rally

PCS

Picket Line

Banner

Placard

Solidarity from other groups

Industrial Workers of the World (IWW)

Disabled People Against Cuts (DPAC)

Aston Against Fees and Cuts

Handsworth Against the Cuts

Handsworth Library

Handsworth Library

Handsworth Library

With thanks for the photos to:

@JhonCooper – Flickr Set

DPAC – Flickr Set

Jo Stevenson from Handsworth Against the Cuts

Becca Kirkpatrick

Vez Kirkpatrick

John Cooper – Flickr Set

Fiona Raychell

Euan Smith

 

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J30 Mass Strikes in Photos

(c) Geoff Dexter Sherborne Publications

Thursday 30th June (dubbed J30) saw mass strikes around the UK from NUT, ATL, UCU and PCS Unions over pensions.  In Birmingham we also had UNISON members striking – council workers out because of pay cuts and changes to conditions, and Connexions members out over job cuts.  With hundreds of pickets, 14 feeder demos and the main strike rally & march, there is far too much to cover in a word report, so here are pictures from the day (A second post of pictures is found here

Pickets

Selly Oak Library

Norfolk House

Central Library

City Centre House

EHRC

Victoria Square House

Hamstead Hall Secondary School

Handsworth Leisure Centre

Redfern Fleet and Waste Depot

Stirchley and Cotteridge Against the Cuts

Weather Oak Day Centre picket line

Northfield Demo

Strike Rally


8,000 people on the March

Speakers

I’m afraid I don’t recognise most of these people, and I wasn’t there this afternoon – so if anyone can fill in the blanks, I’d be grateful 🙂 – Just tell me in a comment

Rhiannon Lockley, Halesowen College UCU

Caroline Johnson - Birmingham Unison

Kevin Courtney - NUT

People

Contributors

With thanks to everyone for the photos:
Geoff Dexter Sherborne Publications (all the ones with GD in the filename, if you hover your cursor over an image) More of his photos here and here

Chris Hughes from Strichley and Cotteridge Against the Cuts
Sue Thomas
Sharon McCourt
Fiona Rachell
Edward Bauer

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Final preparations for J30

Tommorow sees mass public sector strikes, and Birmingham will see some of the largest strikes, as teachers and civil servants are joined by council workers and connexions to strike for the alternative.

Over the last few days, final preparations have taken place for the hundreds of pickets, demos and rallies that will happen tomorrow. I have been trying to get as much information as possible and map out the actions so you know where you can go – at the moment there are over 70 actions listed around Birmingham, but this is by no means a complete list.
Have a look at the map to see what is happening near you, join a picket line in the morning (if there’s none shown near you, I’ve probably just missed it – PCS should be out at all Job Centre’s, and UNISON council workers will probably be picketing all the leisure centres).
Join one of the UNISON demos at 10am, UCU at Bournville College at 9:15, Connexions on Broad Street at 10:45 or the rallies in Wolverhampton and Stourbridge which will all converge on Victoria Square at 12noon for a huge regional strike rally, with national and local speakers from all the unions and groups involved.

Over the last few days, unions and activists have been working hard to build Thursdays’ events, and to take the argument for the alternative to parents, members of the public and of course the workers themselves.
From door-to-door leafletting and street stalls to the Unite The Resistance meeting last night, hard work has been going to make sure that tomorrow is a huge carnival of resistance to the ConDem’s austerity agenda, and the next stage in the struggle against cuts after March 26th’s March for the Alternative.

At the Unite The Resistance meeting last night, which close to 100 people attended, we heard from Alan Whittaker – past president of UCU – who spoke about how much teachers will be losing if the pension changes come in. For a teacher aged 25, the total loss over 25 years of retirement will be nearly £300,000.  Even for those nearing retirement, the loss will be in the tens of thousands of pounds.

Alan told us how in 2007 the teachers pension scheme was audited and was in good stead, and how there is no reason other than ideology to make the changes to pensions the government are proposing.

Talking about the anti-cuts movment, he said

This Thursday we are going to see [the British revolt] come to life with a vengeance

Sue Bond – Vice President of PCS spoke next, continuing from Alan, saying that since March 26th there has been talk about what next, and that tomorrows action is what is next:

On Thursday, we are sending a message to the government that we will not pay for a crisis we did not cause

She told us how both the National Audit Office and the Public Accounts Committee say that civil service pensions are both affordable and sustainable – much like the teachers pensions, and that money saved will not go to make pensions affordable in the future, but will be going to pay off the deficit that was not caused by civil servants.

Sue then outlined some of the alternatives that are supported by PCS and the TUC – closing the tax gap (£120bn of tax avoidance, evasion and uncollected tax each year – enough to cover the whole of the deficit) & investment in jobs and growth (in particular green jobs in the manufacturing sector).

Calling for unity, and crediting the students and UK Uncut for inspiring the cuts movement and the unions to take action, see said that the private sector should not be divided from the public sector – “we want quality pensions for all”, and called for everyone to “rise like Lions and win”, finishing by saying

We defend every single job and oppose every single cut

Caroline Johnson from Birmingham City Council UNISON talked of the devastating changes the council are trying to force onto council workers.  She told us how people are facing huge pay cuts and also savage changes to conditions, which mean the council will be able to tell them to work any job on their pay grade, at any location in the city, at any times (including evening, weekend and unsociable hours).

Sheila, a care assistant currently earning £18,404 will lose £4,741.  Aleena, a part-time cleaner earning just £3,087 will lose a whopping £847.  Donna, a home care assitant on £14,829 will see her pay cut by £2,210 and Jeanette, who is part-time, earning £10,168 will lost £4,453.  Meanwhile, those who are above a grade 4 will not see their pay cut at all – in fact the only thing they are going to lose is their car parking space.

These pay cuts will only save £10m from the council budget so it’s not about saving money – the council spent £60million last year on private sector consultants – so called “experts” who come in to advise on “savings” (otherwise known as advising the council on how to give more money to private sector companies like Capita).  These pay cuts and condition changes are about setting the council’s services up for privatisation.

Calling for support for the council workers, Caroline said:

We are losing all this, and our pensions

She said she was very pleased to be striking alongside other unions on Thursday, that their members are concerned about going it alone, but they know that over the summer they will have to do that.  She does not think the council will back down easily and anticipates further strikes over the summer and autumn to prevent the imposition of this disgusting contract in November.

Finally, Kevin Courtney from NUT spoke, he briefly mentioned pensions but decided not to cover the same grounds as Alan Whittaker UCU, and instead talked about how we are all in this together:

People were all in the same boat in the titanic, but if you were in first class you got on a lifeboat.  If you were in steerage you drowned

Like other speakers, Kevin talked about tax avoidance, calling Philip Green (who in 2005 paid his wife £1.2billion, avoiding £285million in tax) “astonishingly avaricious”.  He said that the pensions fight is a dispute that teachers can win, and that if we do score a victory it will change the dynamic of the anti-cuts movement.

He said that the government has completely lost the confidence of the teaching proffesion, pointing out that ATL have never balloted for strike action in 125 years, but they got an 83% vote for strike, and the fact that a heads union will ballot for strike shows how badly the government have misjudged the mood of the teachers.  He also said that this could not just be about teachers for them, but about all public sector pensions.

Saying that “the cuts are completely without justification”, Kevin explained how in negotiations, the government would not justify their position.  When asked why the pensions are changing from RPI to CPI, the government simply said “we think it is appropriate” without explaining why it is appropriate, or why they will use RPI for student loans.  He said the government produce no arguments – that this is simply an attack on public sector workers.

Kevin finished by saying that this is a choice between whether you give in or whether you fight

On this Thursday we start the fight to defend our pensions and to strike for the alternitve to cuts and job losses

There was then time for discussion from the floor, and people were keen to link up the strikes to the wider fights against cuts, austerity and neo-liberalism.  Various things were mentioned, including the decision by Connexions to join the strike on Thursday, and the demonstrations that will take place for the Liberal Democrat conference in Birmingham (18th Sept) and the Tory conference in Manchester (2nd Oct).

This Thursday, the fight back continues – what started with the Tory conference march in Birmingham in October last year, and was given a huge boost by the student demonstrations in November and December, and groups like UK Uncut, through the March for the Alternative, local council cut and mayday demonstrations and will not just continue but grow and spread tomorrow.  J30 will be a date to remember.

All photos (c) Geoff Dexter Sherborne Publications.  More photos from the Unite The Resistance meeting can be seen here

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Unite the Resistance – J30 Meeting

On Tuesday, there will be a public meeting, called by representatives of UCU, NUT and PCS whose unions will be on strike on Thursday, along with ATL and UNISON.

Speakers at the meeting include:

Kevin Courtney – Deputy General Secretary of NUT

Sue Bond – PCS Vice President

Alan Whittaker – UCU Past President.

The meeting runs from 7:30pm at the council house, and everyone who wants to help to make June 30th the biggest day so far in the struggle against cuts and the austerity agenda, and to help fight for public services and the alternative, is welcome to attend.

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Mass Strikes in Birmingham on 30th June

UNISON today announced that it’s council workers will be on strike on the 30th, this is shaping up to be the largest strike in recent history.

We have already reported that teachers and civil servants voted for strikes in national ballots that could see over 500,000 public sector workers on strike over pensions.  The best way to keep up with what is happening around the country is J30strike.org or on twitter as @J30Strike.

Locally the strike is set to be huge, with the addition of up to 9,000 council workers.  As well as that UCU members at Birmingham City University and in the Birmingham Adult Education Service have previously been balloted for strike and will join in on the 30th June.

I will be endeavouring to get a list of pickets and other activities around Birmingham on the 30th, and mapping them out on this page

There will be a huge, regional, strike rally in Birmingham, assembling at 12noon in Victoria Square.  Invite people to the facebook event.  Strikers from around the West Midlands will come to the city centre of Birmingham for the rally, with workers in Wolverhampton holding a rally from 10:45-11:15am and then coming into Birmingham en masse.

 

With so many workers on strike, this rally should number in the thousands, and will march around the city centre.

Kevin Courtney (NUT) will speak at the J30 rally

Speakers at the rally include Kevin Courtney (Deputy General Secratary of the NUT), Hugh Lanning (Deputy General Secretary of PCS) and Michael McNeil (UCU Head of HE).  We expect to have confirmation on speakers from ATL and UNISON as well.  There will also be local speakers from all the unions involved and someone from Birmingham Against the Cuts.

We call for everyone who can to attend the rally.  If you work, can you book a day of annual leave, or come an join us in your lunch hour?  If you are a student, benefit claimant, pensioner, parent or anyone else who is not working on that day, come and attend.  Make this about the cuts, and austerity in general and not just about the specific strike actions on that day.  This strike is part of the anti-cuts movement – obviously and directly in the case of UNISON, and although the pensions question has been ongoing since before the crisis, the way in which the ConDem’s are seeking to change public sector pensions (whilst leaving MPs’ pensions alone of course) fits directly with the austerity programme, and the wider anti-public services ideology that pervades this coalition.

hugh lanning (PCS) will speak at the J30 rally

Show the strikers that they have your support.  I will by posting a post sometime this week with more of the arguments as to why public sector worker pensions should matter to private sector workers, or people who don’t work.  You can read some of it in the posts about the Teachers and Civil Servants strike decision.

In the case of UNISON it’s pretty simple – huge cuts in pay and big changes in condition for workers cannot improve the services provided by the council, who are also cutting funding by a whopping £212million this year.  As council services degrade, the ideology of the ruling parties suggest to me that they will look to outsource those services to the private sector, probably with similar results to the childrens homes (in short: costs more for a worse service).

They are striking to defend public services.  The dispute they can raise is about pensions, pay and terms and conditions.  With attacks on the unions coming from politicians, it is important that we show the strikers that they have our support.  So parents, if your school is closing on the 30th June, why not bring your kids along to the rally.

 

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Filed under Birmingham City Council, Events, strike